公民婚姻、同性伴侣和宗教自由:来自美国学者活动家的思考外文翻译资料

 2021-11-02 10:11

附录一:外文文献的中文翻译

附录二:外文原文

Civil marriage, same-sex couples, and religious freedom: reflections from a U.S. scholar-activist

ABSTRACT

In responding to three scholarsrsquo; analyses of the public role of religion in the cultural debate about same-sex marriage, a U.S. ethicist and social activist examines a case study of a public debate in the State of Maine (U.S.A.) and considers two questions: (1) how to frame a religious argument in favor of marriage equality rather than one based on a liberal rights framework, and (2) given the religiously

based opposition to marriage equality, how to critique their discriminatory claims without deprecating religion itself?

KEYWORDS

Marriage; same-sex marriage; the public role of religion; discrimination; religious liberty; and conscience claims

In the late 1990s, I wrote an essay on same-sex marriage for a Festschrift in honor of feminist ethicist Beverly W. Harrison on the eve of her retirement from Union Theological Seminary in New York.1 Back then, I imagined that 30 or so pages would likely exhaust the topic or at least do it sufficient justice. Today, after writing at least a half-dozen additional essays as well as an entire book about marriage equality, I am chastened by his torian Nancy Cottrsquo;s observation:

Marriage is like the sphinx – a conspicuous and recognizable monument on the landscape, full of secrets. In assessing matrimonyrsquo;s wonders or terrors, most people view it as a matter of private decision-making and domestic arrangements. The monumental public character of marriage [as well as the compulsion that is involved] is generally its least noticed aspect.

Irsquo;m grateful to colleagues David Bos, Marco Derks, and Mariecke van den Berg for their efforts to keep sorting out the implications of marriage for understanding the public role of religion, the authority and coercive power of the state, and the ongoing reconstruction of identities and communities. Let me identify some of what grabbed my attention in their articles and along the way pose a few questions.

David Bos is helpful in giving us a cautionary warning not to be glib in answering the question, when is a couple married? Does a marriage take place only when the couple receives a state-sanctioned license and a civil contract has been formalized? Or is it when the couple proceeds to church, synagogue, or mosque in order to be married in the eyes of God? Or does the couple marry apart from church and state when they privately exchange promises and mutually consent to make a life together? What action makes a marriage real and by which actors?

That question resides in the shadows of Bosrsquo; analysis of various public and private reli gious celebrations of same-sex relationships in the Netherlands. Rightly he argues, lsquo;If one looks at celebrations rather than legislation, at rites instead of rights, then the history of same-sex marriage goes further back in time than the first decade of the twenty-first century – and even further back than the 1990s.rsquo; As Bos suggests, queer histories arefar more complex – and interesting – than many imagine insofar as lsquo;religious solemniza tions of same-sex relationships occurred well beforersquo; any nation-state legalized marriage for gay and lesbian couples (emphasis added). Religious communities located on the margins, including the Remonstrant Brotherhood and some Mennonites, officially allowed – and were public about – the blessing of same-sex relationships while, at the same time, a few mainstream Protestant denominations occasionally did similar blessings, but kept them hidden from public view. How then should the history of same-sex marriage be told, and by whom, so that the narrative neither ignores religion nor casts it as peren nially opposed to LBGTQ justice? What are the challenges and opportunities for crafting a more adequate narrative?

Derksrsquo; analysis disrupts efforts to draw static distinctions between civil and religious, public and private, contract and covenant. In the Netherlands clergy are not allowed to officiate at civil marriage ceremonies, and a religious ceremony is allowed to take place only after a marriage registrar conducts a civil wedding. Therefore, one might assume that civil weddings conducted by civil servants are not religious, but Derks tells a different story. For many secular Dutch citizens, lsquo;the marriage registrar [ hellip; ] seems to have takenover the role of the priest (or minister) in the formation of marriage,rsquo; he observes. Moreover, the fierce battle over same-sex marriage is explicable only if we take into account thatsome perceive that it is not only marriage, but also religion – or at least hetero-normative religiosity – that is under threat. If religious conservatives have latched onto marriage making with such ferocity because they fear that marriage is one of the last possible expressions of religion in the public sphere, then I would welcome hearing more about possibly effective strategies, especially from religious communities, that might address those anxieties, but without undermining LBGTQ rights.

Mariecke van den Berg examines, in turn, how religious opponents of same-sex marriage in Sweden became, in her words, lsquo;much more outspoken than many Swedes were accustomed to.rsquo; At the same, the Protect Marriage campaign, even though a religious coalition, lsquo;did not present its argumentation in religious termsrsquo;. Instead, these marriagetraditionalists relied on a legal-rights discourse that typically focuses on equal rights and opposes discrimination, especially of the majority against the minority. In doing so, con servative religionists positioned themselves as a minority group, which in a liberal society customarily elicits calls for protective tolerance. All this sounds eerily familiar within the U.S. context in places like the State of Maine where I live. In 2012 a majority of Maine citizens voted to secure marriage

附录一:外文文献的中文翻译

公民婚姻、同性伴侣和宗教自由:来自美国学者活动家的思考

摘要:为了回应三位学者对同性婚姻文化辩论中宗教公共角色的分析,美国伦理学家和社会活动家研究了缅因州(美国)公开辩论的案例,并考虑了两个问题: (1)如何构建支持婚姻平等的宗教论据而不是基于自由权利框架的宗教论据。(2)鉴于宗教上反对婚姻平等,如何在不贬低宗教本身的情况下批评他们的歧视性主张?

关键词:婚姻;同性婚姻;宗教的公共作用歧视;宗教自由和良心的要求

上世纪90年代,为了纪念即将从联合神学院退休的民族主义者费姆,我写了一篇关于同性婚姻的文章。为了使同性婚姻这个话题足够公正,那时我以为这篇文章可能会耗尽30页左右。今天在写了至少六篇关于婚姻平等的论文以及一本关于婚姻平等的整本书之后,我受到了南希科特的观察:

婚姻就像狮身人面像,一个在景观上肉眼可识别的纪念碑,充满了秘密。在评估婚姻的奇迹或恐怖时,大多数人认为这是私人决策和国内形势的问题。 婚姻的公共性(以及所涉及的强制性)通常是最不被大家注意的方面。

我很感谢同事大卫·博斯、马可·德克斯和玛丽克·范登伯格的不断努力理清婚姻对于理解宗教的公共角色、国家的权威和强制力以及正在进行的重建的身份和社区的影响。 我在他们的文章中找出一些引起我注意的东西,并在此过程中提出一些问题。

大卫·博斯在给我们一个警告时很有帮助,就是不要在回答关于婚姻问题时油嘴滑舌。一对夫妻什么时候结婚? 只有当这对夫妇获得国家批准的执照并且民事合同正式化后,婚姻才会成立吗? 或者,当这对夫妇前往教堂,犹太教堂或清真寺以便在上帝哪里获得结婚呢? 或者当这对夫妇私下交换承诺并双方同意共同生活时,他们是否必须通过教会和国家的形式结婚? 什么样的行为使婚姻真实?

这个问题存在于博斯对荷兰同性关系的各种公共和私人宗教庆祝活动分析的阴影中。他认为,如果人们看到庆祝活动不是立法,是仪式而不是权利,那么同性婚姻的历史可以追溯到二十一世纪的第一个十年 ,甚至比上世纪90年代还要远。远比许多人想象的“宗教庄严”复杂和有趣。同性关系发生在“任何民族国家的合法婚姻”之前。位于边缘,包括抗议兄弟会和一些门诺派,官方允许并且公开同性关系的祝福,同时,一些主流的新教教派偶尔也会有类似的祝福,但让他们隐藏在公众视野之外。那么,如何讲述同性婚姻的历史,以及由谁来讲述这样的叙述既不会忽视宗教,也不会将其视为对男同性恋、蕾丝、双性恋等正义的强烈反对?制作更充分的叙述有哪些挑战和机遇?

德尔克的分析破坏了在民事和宗教、公共和私人、契约和契约之间划分静态区别的努力。在荷兰,神职人员不得未经国家登记主持民事婚姻仪式,只有在婚姻登记处举行民事婚礼之后才允许举行宗教仪式。因此,人们可能会认为公务员举行的民事婚礼不是宗教性的。但德克斯讲的是另一个故事,对于许多世俗的荷兰公民来说,“婚姻登记员似乎已经接管了牧师(或部长)在婚姻形成中的角色。”他评论道。此外,只有当我们考虑到某些人认为不仅是婚姻,而且是宗教或者至少是异性的规范性宗教信仰受到威胁时,对同性婚姻的激烈争斗才是可以解释的。如果宗教保守派因为害怕婚姻是公共领域最后可能的宗教表达之一而扼杀同性婚姻,那么我欢迎听到更多关于可能有效的策略,特别是来自宗教团体的策略,可能会解决这些问题。焦虑,但不破坏男同性恋、蕾丝、双性恋权利。

凯玛丽文登伯格检查了瑞典同性婚姻的宗教反对者如何成为瑞典人习以为常存在。同样在保护婚姻运动中即使是宗教联盟也没有用宗教术语提出论证。相反,这些婚姻传统主义者依赖于一种法律权利话语,这种话语通常侧重于平等权利。反对歧视,特别是反对少数人的歧视。在这样做时,保守的宗教信仰者将自己定位为少数群体,在自由社会中,这种群体习惯性地引发了对保护性宽容的呼吁。所有这些在我居住的缅因州等美国境内听起来都非常熟悉。 2012年,大多数缅因州公民投票决定将婚姻平等作为一项合法权利,但在此次竞选之后,保守的基督教团体寻求民事立法来保护他们的“宗教自由”,即他们的自由。表面上是出于宗教原因,歧视反对同性恋伴侣而不会因此而受到任何民事处罚。 (关于这一点,请参见下文。)我的问题有两个方面:首先,一个人如何支持宗教婚姻平等,而不是基于自由权利框架?第二,忽视或虔诚地与宗教反对者接触是否具有战略意义,如果选择参与,人们如何批判他们的歧视主张而不贬低宗教本身?

宗教信仰中的歧视是“歧视”还是“宗教自由”?

作为一名努力理解婚姻平等的道德、神学和公共政策含义的学者和活动家,我很感谢这些同事进行的深刻分析,进一步解决这个神秘的狮身人面像,称为宗教和同性婚姻。如上所述。我在缅因州主持了一个宗教间领袖联盟帮助挫败了两个州的宗教自由恢复法案。保守党根据法律智囊团捍卫自由联盟起草的示范立法,在2012年立法机关中引入了第一份《宗教自由复兴》法案。当地的主要赞助商是一位保守的州参议员,他在此时继续共同担任立法机构的司法委员会主席。天主教教区和基督教公民联盟,一个由保守派福音派新教徒组成的网络,积极支持《宗教自由复兴》法案。在过去几年中,这些不太可能的合作,阻碍了同性恋者在就业,住房,公共住宿和信贷方面的民权保护通过,最近,他们联合起来“捍卫传统婚姻”,反对同性伴侣的公民婚姻权利。他们再次失败了。

由于保守派没有设法阻止婚姻平等(或阻止堕胎服务,这是他们社会议程中的另一个主要问题),他们通过主张良心自由主张并积极寻求保护权利的联邦和州法律的宗教豁免来改变策略。堕胎和维护同性伴侣的婚姻。法律学者瑞瓦西格尔和Douglas NeJaime指出,

如果没有数字或信仰的改变,宗教保守派已经从以寻求执行传统道德的多数作为寻求执行官的少数人发言,背离传统道德的法律。如果无法保护传统性行为。通过普遍适用的法律,保守主义者可以保护传统价值观通过自由主义框架主张宗教豁免,并呼吁对多元主义和非歧视的世俗承诺。

这种对良心主张的重新关注使许多自由主义者在支持同性婚姻处于守势。如果自由主义者支持宗教自由,他们不应该通过接受他们的宗教信仰请求来支持保守派吗?如果没有,自由主义者是否已经损害了他们对良心和宗教自由的珍惜承诺?摆脱这种束缚的方法是澄清宗教自由的含义及其限制。

最近的宗教自由主张与传统的自由行使宗教主义不同,人们通常是边缘化社区的成员,为了在自己的信仰团体中行使信仰而寻求独处的权利。(想想美国最高法院审理的寻求保护的美国本土佩约特案件)相比之下,保守派现在正在寻求基于以共谋为基础的良心主张的法律豁免。信仰团体之外的其他人的行为。(这里,想想私人持有的色情爱好游说团及其福音派拥有者如何在美国成功地辩论。)最高法院认为,即使是企业实体也可能要求宗教自由保护。索赔人基于宗教理由反对他们认为会有的法律要求。使他们同谋他人的行为,导致索赔人认为他人的行为即使合法,也是不道德和有罪的。

考虑一下这种情况:虽然人们普遍认为为公众服务的企业应该为所有公众服务,但我们可能会同意,因为我们也重视宗教自由,以容纳依良心拒服者 - 花店,例如拒绝与之开展业务的人。一对同性伴侣因为他或她的宗教信仰而结婚,认为同性恋是不道德的。但是,如果我们不考虑个别情况,而是考虑总体情况,则授予此类宗教自由法案会给第三方带来问题后果。随着越来越多的人开始出现令人不安的模式,并且由于美国连锁店,现在公司实体要求宗教豁免,以便他们可以合法地拒绝向他们认为不道德的公民提供商品和服务。一个宗教认可的严重歧视网络很容易出现,然后扩大,特别是在美国保守地区。结果是传统的“家庭价值观”和保守的宗教规范,在民法权威的支持下,可能是容易对第三方,包括宗教团体之外的第三方实施。因此,国家宗教自由法案将使保守派迄今为止在正在进行的文化战争中未能实现的目标成为可能。通过不断扩大豁免给予越来越多的演员,不仅包括牧师和牧师,还包括花店,餐馆工作人员,酒店业主,汽车租赁公司,旅行社,以及发行和签署民事结婚许可证的县文员,国家最终将授权一项“平行的法律秩序”,重新列入对同性恋和其他人的歧视。

因为宗教领袖是缅因州拟议的《宗教自由》的主要支持者,重要的是,在我们对军团的批评中,信仰领袖是非常明显和有声的。-表示。拟议中的州宗教自由恢复草案法案的反对者提出了这些论点:(1)宗教自由作为美国的核心价值观,也是我们致力于保护的价值观,(2)当前的价值观联邦和州法律正在运作;没有已知的侵权行为需要哪些补救措施;(3)由于没有问题,建议的宗教自由恢复草案法是不需要,(4)宗教自由复兴草案允许个人甚至公司实体挑战,他们认为自己不想遵守的州或地方法律。(5)因此如果通过,这项法律可能会造成伤害并导致对同性恋群体和其他人施加不合理的负担。

作为来自多种传统的信仰领袖,我们不仅强调自由行使宗教的重要性,而且强调其限制。宗教不应该赋予任何人强迫他人遵守其信仰的权利,也不应该援引宗教来伤害他人,特别是宗教团体以外的第三方。我们将这个问题重新定位为在两个价值观之间找到适当的平衡:保护宗教自由和支持公平,在多元社会中尊重他人的权利和福祉,特别是历史上受歧视的社会群体的成员。

在缅因州,立法者反复告诉我们,让宗教自由法案的宗教反对者给予他们掩盖投票反对这项措施。他们对该法案的拒绝被认为不是反宗教的,而是对有问题的立法的原则性拒绝。即便如此,2014年缅因州立法机构还引入了第二项宗教自由复兴法案。同样,它的赞助商是共同主持司法委员会的州参议员。有趣的是,当面对批评者时,他坚持认为,从来没有打算破坏婚姻平等或削弱缅因州的人权法案,所以他自愿将法案修改为说清楚。正是在这一点上,基督教公民联盟和天主教教区迫切要求撤回该法案。通过这样做,他们公开证明他们的议程远不是保护宗教自由,而是保护某些文化价值的霸权。

总而言之,虽然倡导者想要让《宗教自由法案》保护宗教自由,但那些投票反对并最终击败该法案的人认为这是对宗教的滥用。通过宗教歧视少部分显然也是针对种族歧视的。州里的宗教自由复兴也是关于种族的。宗教保守派在缅因州在他们支持一个他们还支持反伊斯兰教法把穆斯林排除在歧视之外。消息传出去了幸运的是,大多数立法者都认识到同性恋抨击和仇视伊斯兰教之间令人讨厌的联系。尽管提议的州关于宗教自由法律似乎是为了达到公平平衡的努力。但他们的倡导者采用这种抵抗策略来阻止进一步向完全社会平等的转变。以“宗教”的名义,但服务于保守的基督教文化议程,这些共谋主张以两种方式给同性恋者和其他人带来负担:第一,通过妨碍获取商品的物质损害和合法可供所有人使用的服务,以及第二,允许一些人通过拒绝与“那些人”公开联系来行使“贬低权力”来造成重大伤害。在法律认可的“拒绝服务”的美国,给予了非正式的和遗憾的信息,宗教信仰者应该对《宗教自由法案》的方式感到震惊法律赋予某些人“宗教豁免”,反过来又会对他人造成真实和道德上不合理的伤害。

(译自:马文·M·埃里森. 公民婚姻、同性伴侣和宗教自由:来自美国学者活动家的思考[J]2017.8.13)

附录二:外文原文

Civil marriage, same-sex couples, and religious freedom: reflections from a U.S. scholar-activist

ABSTRACT

In responding to three scholarsrsquo; analyses of the public role of religion in the cultural debate about same-sex marriage, a U.S. ethicist and social activist examines a case study of a public debate in the State of Maine (U.S.A.) and considers two questions: (1) how to frame a religious argument in favor of marriage equality rather than one based on a liberal rights framework, and (2) given the religiously based opposition to marriage equality, how to critique their discriminatory claims without deprecating religion itself?

KEYWORDS

Marriage; same-sex marriage; the public role of religion; discrimination; religious liberty; and conscience claims

In the late 1990s, I wrote an essay on same-sex marriage for a Festschrift in honor of feminist ethicist Beverly W. Harrison on the eve of her retirement from Union Theological Seminary in New York.1 Back then, I imagined that 30 or so pages would likely exhaust the topic or at least do it sufficient justice. Today, after writing at least a half-dozen additional essays as well as an entire book about marriage equality, I am chastened by historian Nancy Cottrsquo;s observation:

Marriage is like the sph

原文和译文剩余内容已隐藏,您需要先支付 20元 才能查看原文和译文全部内容!立即支付

以上是毕业论文外文翻译,课题毕业论文、任务书、文献综述、开题报告、程序设计、图纸设计等资料可联系客服协助查找。